Which team holds the record for the lowest number of points in a Premier League season?

Which team holds the record for the lowest number of points in a Premier League season? In March, 2019, Huddersfield Town were relegated from the Premier League after 32 matches of a 38-match season, making them just the third team, after Derby County and Ipswich Town, to be heading into the second-tier with half a dozen games remaining. However, even if the Terriers lose both of their remaining fixtures in the 2018/19 season, their total of 14 points will not be the lowest in Premier League history.

The unenviable record for the lowest number of points in a Premier League season is held by Derby County who, in 2007/08, amassed just 11. Newly, and unexpectedly, promoted, Derby County won just one game all season and, by the time they parted company with manager Billy Davies, by ‘mutual consent’, in November, 2007, had accumulated just 6 points from 14 matches and were bottom of the league. Davies’ replacement, Paul Jewell, failed to inspire a revival and, by the end of the season, Derby County had set a whole series of unwelcome Premier League records, including for fewest goals scored (20) and most goals conceded (89) – resulting in an eye-watering goal difference of -69 – and for most losses (29).

Why are tennis balls changed so frequently?

Why are tennis balls changed so frequently?

Modern tennis balls consist of an inner rubber core, filled with pressurised air, and a outer cover, made of wool or nylon, which is bound to the core by means of a heated press. According to the International Tennis Federation (ITF), when a tennis ball is dropped, vertically, onto a smooth, granite block from a height of 100”, or 8’4”, it should rebound to a height between 53” and 58”.

However, after a period of serious play – typically about three hours – the cover of a tennis ball may become fluffed up, so that the ball does not fly through the air as fast as a new one, and the ball may lose internal pressure, so that it does not bounce as high. Obviously, both these factors can adversely affect the control and accuracy of a tennis player, so tennis balls are routinely changed after every seven and nine games, alternately, throughout the course of a tennis match. The first ball change takes place after just seven games to allow for the warm-up. High humidity increases the moisture content of a tennis ball, and hence its mass, and high temperature can cause the ball to bounce higher, so ‘new’ balls are stored in a courtside refrigerator, maintained at a constant 68°F, or 20°C, to keep them in optimal condition.

What’s the record winning margin in an international rugby match?

What’s the record winning margin in an international rugby match? The record for the widest winning margin in an international rugby match is held jointly by Argentina and Japan; interesting the record was set by Argentina on May 1, 2002 and equalled by Japan just over two months later.

In their match, against Paraguay, at the Mendoza Rugby Club in western Argentina, Los Pumas ran up a score of 152 points, including 24 tries, without reply; left wing Facundo Soler, right wing Jose Nunez Piossek and lock Pedro Sporleder all scored four tries apiece. Not to be outdone, in their match, against Chinese Taipai, at the Prince Chichibu Memorial Stadium in Tokyo, the Cherry Blossoms scored 155 points, including 23 tries, with just a solitary penalty in reply; left wing Daisuke Ohata, who later became the leading tryscorer in international rugby, scored eight tries.

Coincidentally, Japan were on the receiving end when New Zealand recorded the widest winning margin in the history of the Rugby World Cup, in South Africa in 1995; the All Blacks ran in a record 21 tries en route to a 145-17 victory.

For the record, in club rugby, the widest winning margin was achieved, under peculiar circumstances, in a match between Royal Kituro and Soignies in the top division of the Belgian league in 2015. After the referee was delayed, by over an hour, the most of the Soignies players departed, along with their coach, assuming the match had been cancelled. However, the match did go ahead and, in protest, the remaining Soignies players allowed the opposition to score, unhindered, throughout the match. Royal Kituro eventually scored 356 points, including 56 tries, against a lone drop goal, to win by a margin of 353 points.

What, exactly, is the ‘Drake Curse’?

What, exactly, is the ‘Drake Curse’? The so-called ‘Drake Curse’ is a series of unfortunate, but hardly supernatural, coincidences that are associated with the Canadian rapper Aubrey Drake Graham, otherwise known by the mononym ‘Drake’. Since he rose to prominence as a recording artist in 2009, Drake has posed for photographs with, and/or endorsed, some of the top athletes in the world and, more often than not, they have subsequently suffered misfortune of one form or another.

Of course, Drake isn’t really ‘cursed’ or ‘jinxed’ but, for anyone remotely superstitious, his uncanny ability to put the mockers on heavily favoured, elite sportsmen and women is definitely cause for concern. In April, 2019 alone, Drake was pictured alongside footballers including Jadon Sancho of Borussia Dortmund, Pierre-Emerick Aubmeyang of Arsenal and Sergio Aguero of Manchester City, who all suffered major reversals of fortune almost as soon as the pictures were uploaded to social media.

The latest high-profile ‘victim’ of the Drake Curse was former unified world heavyweight champion Anthony Joshua, who posted a photograph of himself and the Toronto rapper on Instagram shortly before his shock defeat by virtually unknown Mexican Andy Ruiz Jr. at Madison Square Garden on June 1, 2019. In what Joshua billed as the ‘bout to beat the curse’, Ruiz Jr., who weighed in at a seemingly overweight 268 pounds and could be backed at 25/1 beforehand, won by technical knockout in the seventh round, creating the biggest heavyweight boxing upset since James ‘Buster’ Douglas knocked out Mike Tyson in Tokyo in 1990.

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