How many times did Usain Bolt break the 100-metre world record?

How many times did Usain Bolt break the 100-metre world record? Widely considered the greatest sprinter of all time, over 100 and 200 metres, Jamaican Usain Bolt, who announced his retirement from athletics in August, 2017, requires little introduction. Individually, he won gold medals in both the 100-metre and 200-metre events at three consecutive Olympics – Beijing in 2008, London in 2012 and Rio de Janeiro in 2016 – and still holds world records at both distances.

On May 3, 2008, at the Jamaica International Invitation in Kingston, Jamaica, Bolt posted a winning time of 9.76 seconds, just 0.02 seconds slower than the existing world record, 9.74 seconds, set by compatriot Asafa Powell in Rieti, Italy the previous September. Four weeks later, at the Reebok Grand Prix in New York, USA, on May 31, 2008, Bolt broke the 100-metre world record for the first time, defeating reigning world champion Tyson Gay in a time of 9.72 seconds.

Less than three months later, in the 100-metre final at the Beijing Olympics on August 16, 2008, broke the world record again, winning in a time of 9.69 seconds, despite raising his arms in celebration 20 metres before the line when well ahead. A year to the day later, Bolt faced Tyson Gay again in the 100-metre final at the World Athletics Championships in Berlin, Germany, advertised locally as ‘Das Duell’. Tyson clocked 9.71 seconds but, even so, finished nowhere near Bolt, who crossed the line in 9.58 seconds, taking 0.11 seconds off his previous world record.

Which professional golfer has played the most tournaments without winning?

Which professional golfer has played the most tournaments without winning? The PGA Tour is arguably the most important, and definitely the most lucrative, golf tour in the world. Week in, week out, between 120 and 156 of the best golfers on the planet tee it up in PGA Tour events, but only one can win. Winning on the PGA Tour remains notoriously difficult; some golfers play their entire career without ever doing so.

At the last count, the record for the most PGA Tour events without a win is held by Massachusetts-born Brett Quigley. Quigley, 49, is ranked number 2,066 in the world, according to Official World Golf Rankings (OWGR) and currently plays on the developmental Web.com Tour, formerly the Nationwide Tour. Formerly U.S. Junior Amateur Champion, Quigley turned professional in 1991 and has two victories on the second tier tour – namely the Philadelphia Classic, in 1996, and the Arkansas Classic, in 2001 – to his name. However, on the main tour, Quigley has made a total of 407 starts and never finished better than second.

Of course, Quigley is not the only golfer to have made, quite literally, hundreds of starts on the PGA Tour without winning. Florida-born Michael Jancey ‘Briny’ Baird, for example, played 379 events on the PGA Tour, earning over $13 million, but the closest he ever came to winning was when losing a playoff, on the sixth extra hole, to Bryce Molder in the Frys.com Open, now the Safeway Open, in 2011. Baird hasn’t played a PGA Tour since 2014 and has since been surpassed as the highest money-winner never to win a tournament by Englishman Brian Davis, who has played 346 events.

Who is the reigning champion jockey?

Who is the reigning champion jockey? In Britain, of course, horse racing is staged under two ‘codes’, Flat and National Hunt, and each discipline has its own jockeys’ championship and corresponding champion jockey.

The jump jockeys’ championship, currently sponsored by British infrastructure company Stobart, is decided on the total number of winners ridden in National Hunt races between early May and late April. At the time of writing, in late April, 2019, the newly-crowned champion jockey is Richard Johnson, who took the title, for the fourth year running, with 200 winners, 22 ahead of his nearest rival, Harry Skelton.

The flat jockeys’ championship, also sponsored by Stobart, is decided on the total number of winners ridden in Flat races, on turf or synthetic, ‘all-weather’ surfaces, between early May and mid-October. Consequently, the flat jockeys’ championship for 2019 has yet to begin, but the reigning champion jockey is Brazilian-born Silvestre De Sousa, who took the 2018 title, for the third time in four years, with 148 winners, 27 ahead of his nearest rival, Oisin Murphy.

Which is the largest football stadium in the world?

Which is the largest football stadium in the world? Association football is, far and away, the most popular spectator sport on the planet, with nearly half the population of the world taking an interest. Indeed, football dominates most of Europe, South America, Africa and Asia, and it is no real surprise that some of the largest football stadiums in the world are to be found on those continents.

In Africa, for example, the First National Bank (FNB) Stadium, also known as Soccer City, in Nasrec, a suburb of Johannesburg, South Africa, is the third largest football stadium in the world. Originally built in 1987, the FNB Stadium was upgraded in preparation for the FIFA World Cup in 2010 – it was, in fact, the venue for the World Cup Final between Netherlands and Spain – and nowadays has a seating capacity of 94,736.

In Europe, the Camp Nou, which has been the home of Barcelona Football Club since 1957, is the largest football stadium on the continent and the second largest in the world. Built over a period of three years between 1954 and 1957, at a cost of 288,000,000 Ptas – approximately £3,500,000, allowing for inflation – Camp Nou has a seating capacity of 99,354 and the largest football stadium in Europe.

Perhaps surprisingly, the distinction of having the largest football stadium in the world belongs to Asia and, specifically, to North Korea, traditionally one of the least accessible countries in the world. The Rungrado May Stadium in the capital city, Pyongyang, was built in 1989 and has floor space in excess of 50 acres, not to mention capacity for 114,000 spectators.

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