What’s the record winning margin in an international rugby match?

What’s the record winning margin in an international rugby match? The record for the widest winning margin in an international rugby match is held jointly by Argentina and Japan; interesting the record was set by Argentina on May 1, 2002 and equalled by Japan just over two months later.

In their match, against Paraguay, at the Mendoza Rugby Club in western Argentina, Los Pumas ran up a score of 152 points, including 24 tries, without reply; left wing Facundo Soler, right wing Jose Nunez Piossek and lock Pedro Sporleder all scored four tries apiece. Not to be outdone, in their match, against Chinese Taipai, at the Prince Chichibu Memorial Stadium in Tokyo, the Cherry Blossoms scored 155 points, including 23 tries, with just a solitary penalty in reply; left wing Daisuke Ohata, who later became the leading tryscorer in international rugby, scored eight tries.

Coincidentally, Japan were on the receiving end when New Zealand recorded the widest winning margin in the history of the Rugby World Cup, in South Africa in 1995; the All Blacks ran in a record 21 tries en route to a 145-17 victory.

For the record, in club rugby, the widest winning margin was achieved, under peculiar circumstances, in a match between Royal Kituro and Soignies in the top division of the Belgian league in 2015. After the referee was delayed, by over an hour, the most of the Soignies players departed, along with their coach, assuming the match had been cancelled. However, the match did go ahead and, in protest, the remaining Soignies players allowed the opposition to score, unhindered, throughout the match. Royal Kituro eventually scored 356 points, including 56 tries, against a lone drop goal, to win by a margin of 353 points.

What is the wooden spoon?

What is the wooden spoon? The wooden spoon is figurative booby prize awarded, in good-natured ridicule, to the team that finishes bottom of the table in the annual Six Nations rugby tournament. Historically, a real, physical wooden spoon was presented to the student who achieved the lowest mark in the final honours degree examinations, known as tripos, in mathematics at Cambridge University, but still earned a third-class degree. The last such spoon was awarded at Cambridge University in 1909, but 15 years earlier, the ‘South Wales Daily Post’ had already used the term, in the correct sense, in connection with rugby union.

The Six Nations began life as the Home Nations Championship – as the name suggests, featuring just England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales – in 1883. Since then, Ireland has won the wooden spoon 29 times, followed by Scotland on 21, England on 19 and Wales on 16. The Home Nations Championship became the Five Nations Championship between 1910-1931 and 1947-1999, with the addition of France, and the Six Nations Championship from 2000 onwards, with the addition of Italy. France has won the wooden spoon 12 times, but Italy has already finished bottom of the table in 13 of its 19 appearances.

Who is the leading tryscorer in international rugby union?

Who is the leading tryscorer in international rugby union? Rugby union is the most popular form of rugby, globally, and is played in over a hundred countries on six countries. Indeed, rugby union is the national sport in developed countries, such as New Zealand, Wales, Fiji, Samoa, Tonga and Georgia – all of whom have played, at one time or another, in the Rugby World Cup – and even in Madagascar, which is one of the least developed countries in the world, according to the United Nations.

Half a dozen players have scored 50 or more tries in international rugby, but the leading tryscorer of all time is the former Japanese wing, and occasional centre, Daisuke Ohata. Ohata rose to prominence in the World Rugby Sevens Series but, having scored a hat-trick on his debut for the Japanese national team on November 9, 1996, went on to play 58 test matches. All in all, he scored 69 tries and, while his record was criticised because he spent much of his career playing inferior nations, he also scored tries against against France, Ireland, Wales and Argentina.

Second place on the list of all-time tryscorers in international rugby is former South African wing Bryan Habana, with 67 tries. A Rugby World Cup winner in 2007, Habana also jointly holds the record, with Jonah Lomu, for the number of tries scored in a single Rugby World Cup tournament (8) and for the number of tries scored at the Rugby World Cup (15). Habana is closely followed by former Australian wing and full-back David ‘Campo’ Campese, with 64 tries in 101 test matches; Campese was the first Australian player to participate in hundred test matches.

Why is a rugby ball egg-shaped?

Why is a rugby ball egg-shaped? Nowadays, World Rugby specifies the shape, dimensions and weight of the modern rugby ball, which must be elliptical, made of four panels and weigh between 410 and 460 grams. Dimensions-wise, the ball must be between 280 and 300mm in length, with an end-to-end circumference of between 740 and 770mm and a circumference between 580 and 620mm around the middle, or width, of the ball.

However, in the early pioneering days of rugby, during the nineteenth century, rugby balls were typically made from raw pigs’ bladders inflated, by mouth, with a clay pipe stem, covered in leather and stitched together by hand. Consequently, the ball took on, more or less, the shape of the bladder; larger and more spherical than the modern rugby ball. In 1892, the governing body of rugby union in England, the Rugby Football Union, decreed that the rugby ball should be oval. Subsequently, the original plum-shaped rugby became flatter and more elongated, with more tapered ends, making it more suitable for handling and kicking during a rugby match.