In golf, what is a condor?

In golf, what is a condor? In the natural world, a condor is a huge, but increasingly rare, New World vulture. In golf, a condor is also a ‘rare bird’; in fact, the rarest of them all. The term ‘condor’ refers to a score of four-under-par on a single hole. The odds against achieving a score of three-under-par on a single hole, known in golfing parlance, as an ‘albatross’ or ‘double eagle’, are apparently 6,000,000/1, but despite astronomical odds, albatrosses have been scored in numerous important golf tournaments, including major championships, down the years.

By contrast, the elusive condor has never been scored in professional golf, or on a professionally accredited golf course. That should come as no surprise, because a condor equates to scoring a hole-in-one on a par-five, a two on a par-six or three on a par-seven, although par-six and par-seven golf holes are few and far between worldwide.

A condor is nigh on impossible but, even so, in the entire history of golf four condors, all on par-five holes, have been reliably recorded. Three of them occurred on holes with a sharp bend, or dogleg, in the fairway, allowing players to diminish the total yardage tee-to-green by ‘cutting the corner’, or going for the green as the crow flies. The other, recorded by Professor Mike Crean, of the University of Denver, on the 517-yard, par-5 ninth hole at Green Valley Ranch Golf in 2002, was aided by high altitude, hard ground and a 30 mph tailwind, but nonetheless represented the longest hole-in-one ever recorded.

Who scored the slowest century in test cricket history?

Who scored the slowest century in test cricket history? In the history of test cricket, several English batsmen, notably Geoff Boycott, Chris Tavare and, before them, Trevor ‘Barnacle’ Bailey, have garnered a reputation for snail-paced scoring, so there is a certain irony in the fact that the slowest century in test cricket history was scored against England. In the first test of a three-match series between Pakistan and England, staged at the Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore in December, 1977, England won the toss and elected to bowl. Twenty-one-year-old Mudassar Nazar opened the batting for Pakistan and, with the home side reduced to 49-2 on a difficult wicket, effectively ‘dropped anchor’. At stumps on the first day, Mudassar was 52 not out and he continued in similar vein when play resumed the following morning.

Indeed, even as his hundred approached, Mudassar showed no urgency in his batting and, if anything, became even more defensive. Just one short of his century, the increasingly fractious crowd invaded the pitch, resulting in running fights with the police. The players took an early tea and play resumed, albeit 25 minutes late, with Mudassar still ‘poised’ on 99 not out. Finally, after facing 419 deliveries and spending 557 minutes, or the best part of nine-and-a-half hours, at the crease, Mudassar reached a hundred. When he was finally caught and bowled by off-spin bowler Geoff Miller, he had scored 114 off 449 balls in 591 minutes, at a strike rate of 25.38.

What are the big money moments for Floyd ‘moneymaker’ Mayweather?

What are the big money moments for Floyd 'moneymaker' Mayweather? Love him or loathe him, Floyd Mayweather is, in some regards, unrivaled in the world of boxing both in terms of his 50-0 record, defensive abilities, and his fight purses. As an undefeated fighter and with PPV audiences dying to either see his winning run continue, the dollar sums he was and indeed is able to command and draw in went up and up over the years. Even now when he’s effectively retired from professional boxing, he hasn’t exactly left the scene. A mismatched fight against social media star Logan Paul is imminent for instance, and should bring in the millions once more.

What are the big money moments for Floyd 'moneymaker' Mayweather? Nowadays Floyd Mayweather is more often found in a Las Vegas Casino than he is a boxing ring.No doubt he’s still in need of a rush and certainly falls into the category of having ‘money to burn’. It’s not in high risk credit card processing territory though because even in his advancing years – boxing-wise- he’s capable of bringing in big bucks. Let’s take a look at a few of his fights that effortlessly brought in the crowds and the $$$.

Mayweather vs Pacquiao drew in an astonishing £678M. The fight resulted in 4.6m PPV sales and a record gate. Fans had been hoping for the match up for half a decade and consequently it drew such interest that it was dubbed the Fight of the Century. Inevitably, considering the anticipation beforehand the fight didn’t quite live up to the hype. It was however still a masterclass by Mayweather earning a purse of £223.5m, with Pacquiao earning £122m for the fight.

Next up was what could be classed as Mayweather’s first ‘gimmicky’ fight, against Connor McGregor.  The fight earned £662.5m total (with a £223.5m purse for Mayweather, and £70m for McGregor) and surprisingly MMA superstar McGregor actually put up a better performance than most had anticipation. He certainly didn’t let himself down in what was dubbed ‘The Money Fight’ (how imaginative!). That said at no point did Mayweather actually look in trouble and as such it was something of an easy pay day for the fighter.

Third up and quite a drop was Mayweather vs Canelo, coming it at £214m. The Mexican fighter, who has been a world champion in four different weight classes (as has Mayweather), was a relative youngster when he fought Mayweather and so to an extent was schooled by him, in the fight held at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. Nowadays Canelo is a powerful force in boxing, as he recently demonstrated in his devastating win against the UK’s Billy Joe Saunders. Indeed the fighter hasn’t lost before or since his loss to Mayweather and so it would’ve been a fascinating match-up if they’d both been able to take each other in in their prime.

So all in all we certainly see that Floyd Mayweather is ‘Moneymaker’ by both name and nature. He’s not everyones cup of tea, with his brash and extravagant attitude on full display. At the same time though, it’s hard not to admire someone who has done it all, and essentially not put a foot wrong during their career.

 

What is the longest-standing individual world record in athletics?

What is the longest-standing individual world record in athletics? The longest-standing individual world record in athletics is the 1:53.28 for the women’s 800 metres set by Czech athlete Jarmila Kratochvílová in Munich, Germany on July 26, 1983. At the age of 32, Kratochvílová improved on the previous record of 1:53.43 set by Nadyezhda Olizaryenko of the Soviet Union during the Summer Olympics in Moscow three years earlier. Interestingly, prior to July 26, 1983, the world record for the women’s 800 metres had been broken 23 times since World War II but, at the time of writing, has now stood for over 37 years; according to Svetlana Masterkova, who won the gold medal in the women’s 800 metres at the Summer Olympics in Atlanta in 1996 in a time of 1:57.73, the record ‘will last for 100 years’.

Kratochvílová attracted worldwide attention because of her emergence from mediocrity at an age when most track and field athletes would be considering retirement and her unusually broad-shouldered, flat-chested, ‘masculine’ physique. She never failed a drug test, but competed in an era when state-sponsored doping was rife in Warsaw Pact countries, including Czechoslovakia, so her record, was, is and probably always will be treated with suspicion. Indeed, in 2017, European Athletics proposed that all athletics world records set before 2005, including those never subject suspicion, be expunged to remove any lingering doubts about doping scandals.

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