Where, and what, is the ‘Postage Stamp’?

Where, and what, is the 'Postage Stamp'? The ‘Postage Stamp’ is the name of the par-3 eighth hole on the Old Course at Royal Troon Golf Club in Troon, South Ayrshire, which has hosted the Open Championship on nine occasions. The name was coined when William Park – not to be confused with Willie Park Jr., who won the Open Chanpionship twice, at Prestwick in 1887 and Musselburgh Links in 1889 – described the long, narrow green as ‘a pitching surface skimmed down to the size of a postage stamp’ in an article in ‘Golf Illustrated’ in 1922, but not officially adopted until the Fifties. Indeed, the eighth hole was originally named ‘Ailsa’, after Ailsa Craig, a granite, volcanic island that lies ten miles offshore at the mouth of the Firth of Clyde, but is clearly visible from the elevated teeing ground.

Measuring just 123 yards from the championship tees, the Postage Stamp is, in fact, the shortest hole in Open Championship golf. That said, the sloping green, which measures 40 yards long by 14 yards wide, is protected by five cavernous bunkers, including the infamous ‘Coffin’ bunker, cut into the base of the sandhill that flanks the green to the left. The signature hazard was added when the Old Course was redesigned by five-time Open Champion and renowned golf course architect James Braid in 1922, in preparation for hosting its first Open Championship the following year.

Which is the longest golf hole in the world?

Which is the longest golf hole in the world? According to Guinness World Records, the longest golf hole in the world is the seventh hole on the Sano Course at Satsuki Golf Club in Japan, which measures 964 yards, or 881 metres, from the back tees and is one of the few par-7 holes in the world. Guinness World Records states, ‘All records listed on our website are current and up-to-date’ but, neverthless, in November, 2018, Ladies European Tour professional Florentyna Parker posted pictorial evidence of an even longer hole, also a par-7, at the Gunsan Country Club in South Korea.

The Gunsam Country Club occupies 1,060 acres of low-lying, flat land, formerly a salt field, in North Jeolla Province in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. All told, Gunsan Country Club consists of 81 golf holes, 63 of which are open to the public, but the hole in question is the third on the Jeongeup Course; a photograph of the tee marker confirmed the yardage as 1,098 yards, or 1,004 metres, or a jaunty seven-minute walk, just to cover the distance, never mind negotiating the water hazards that surround the hole, left and right.

After Nicklaus and Woods, which golfer has won the most majors?

After Nicklaus and Woods, which golfer has won the most majors? Golf is of course a big money sport, that puts short attention span types like me – I’m as likely to be found browsing mobile casinos on the course, as I am strategising –  to shame.  In golf, the four major championships are, in the order they appear in the calendar, the Masters, US Open, Open Championship and PGA Championship. Jack Nicklaus won all four at least three times apiece between 1962 and 1986, for a total of 18 wins, while Tiger Woods did likewise between 1997 and 2019, for a total of 15 wins. Of course, Woods is still active on the PGA Tour but, at the age of 44, with his recent career blighted by back and knee injuries, it remains to be seen if he will ever overhaul Nicklaus’ record.

In any event, unlike Nicklaus and Woods, the golfer who comes next in the all-time list of major championship winners never completed a so-called ‘Career Grand Slam’ by winning all four majors at least once during his career. The golfer in question is, of course, Walter ‘The Haig’ Hagen, whose career stretched into the Forties – that is, after the inauguration of the Masters, as the ‘Augusta National Invitational’, in 1934 – but was in his heyday in the Twenties. A contemporary of Bobby Jones and Gene Sarazen, Hagen opened his major championship account, as a 22-year-old, in the 1914 US Open. He won the same tournament again in 1919 and subsequently won the PGA Championship five times, in 1921, 1924, 1925, 1926 and 1927, and the Open Championship four times, in 1922, 1924, 1928 and 1929. His career total of 11 major championship wins is two ahead of Ben Hogan and Gary Player, with nine wins apiece. These guys are in a different league. I had best get back to my online baccarat casinos I think, or better still, the drawing board!

Has any professional golfer record two holes-in-one is the same round?

Has any professional golfer record two holes-in-one is the same round? According to the National Hole-In-One Registry, the odds against any Tour player making a hole-in-one on any given par 3 are 3,000/1, which makes the odds against making two holes-in-one in the same round 9,006,000/1. Astronomical though those odds may seem, the feat has actually been achieved twice, by professional players, on the PGA Tour and once on the European Tour.

In fact, the first player in PGA Tour history to record two holes-in-one in the same round was West Hatford amateur Bill Whedon, who did so during the first round of the Insurance City Open at Wethersfield Country Club, Connecticut in 1955. However, the first bona fide ‘professional’ to achieve the odds-defying feat on the PGA Tour was Japan-born Yusaku Miyazata. During the second round of the Reno-Tahoe Open at Montrêux Golf and Country Club, Nevada, in 2006, Miyazato holed his tee shot on the seventh and twelfth holes. In 2015, American professional Brian Harman recorded his first-ever competitive hole-in-one on the third hole at Plainfield Country Club, New Jersey, during the final round of The Barclays and, lo and behold, his second-ever on the fourteenth.

On the European Tour, Australian professional Andrew Dodt started his second round of the 2013 Nordea Masters at Bro Hof Slott Golf Club in Upplands-Bro, Sweden on the back nine, but made an ace at his second hole of the day, the 175-yard eleventh, and another on his sixteenth, the 208-yard seventh. He has the distinction of being the only European Tour player two holes-in-one in the same round.

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