How many runs can be scored off a single delivery?

How many runs can be scored off a single delivery? Generally speaking, the maximum number of runs that can be scored off a single delivery is six, achieved by hitting the ball over the boundary on the full. However, legend has it that in a match between Western Australia and Victoria in 1894 the ball became lodged in a tree, in sight, but out of reach, and the batsmen completed 286 runs while it was being recovered. More plausible, perhaps, is the 17 runs scored off a single ball by Garry Chapman for Banyule against Macleod in a Grade cricket match at Windsor Park, Victoria, in 1989, when the ball was lost in long grass in the outfield.

Chapman is recognised by Guinness World Records, but in first-class cricket, even Test cricket, instances of eight, nine or ten runs off a single legal delivery are not unknown. In the Test match between Australia and New Zealand in Brisbane in 2008, for example, Australian all-rounder Andrew Symonds scored four off the bat, all run, plus four overthrows for a total of eight runs. In 1842, in a first-class match between Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) and Cambridge University, the Hon. Frederick George Brabazon ‘Fred’ Ponsonby scored nine, all run, off a single delivery on the vast expanse of Parker’s Piece, Cambridge. Ten runs off a single delivery has happened a couple of times in first-class cricket and was recorded most recently by Samuel Hill-Wood for Derbyshire against MCC at Lord’s in 1900.

In 2003, Yorkshire fast bowler Ryan Sidebottom did, effectively, concede 11 runs off a single legal delivery in a first-class match against Glamorgan, but bowled five consecutive wides before being hit for six and retiring hurt.

What is a Mankad dismissal?

What is a Mankad dismissal? The ‘Mankad’ is a perfectly legal, but contentious, method of running out the non-striking batsman in a cricket match. If the non-striker is backing up or, in other words, advancing down the wicket in preparation for a quick run, the bowler may, according to the Laws of Cricket, attempt to run him/her out up to the point when he/she ‘would normally have been expected to release the ball’. According to the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), the law regarding the Mankad dismissal is essential to prevent the non-striker from advancing, unrestricted, down the wicket and, in so doing, gain a huge advantage by leaving his/her ground early

Nevertheless, the dismissal – named after Indian bowler Mulvantrai Himmatlal ‘Vinoo’ Mankad, who twice ran out Australian opening batsman William ‘Bill’ Brown during a tour of Australia in 1947/48 – has always been controversial. Some, but not all, batsmen consider the Mankad unsporting conduct on the part of the bowler and not within the spirit of the game. Others contend that, although there is no legal requirement to do so, a bowler should at least warn a batsman that he/she is in danger of dismissal if he/she persists in leaving his/her ground early – as Mankad originally did to Brown – before dismissing him/her.

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