Who was the first undisputed heavyweight champion?

Who was the first undisputed heavyweight champion? The undisputed heavyweight champion is, of course, a boxer who is recognised as world champion, in the heavyweight division, by each of the sanctioning bodies in professional boxing. Prior to the foundation of the New York State Athletic Commission (NYSAC) in 1920, and the National Boxing Association (NBA) in 1921, the world heavyweight championship was a lineal championship, which could only be won by defeating the existing title holder.

In the early Twenties, the lineal heavyweight champion was William Harrison ‘Jack’ Dempsey, otherwise known as ‘The Manassa Mauler’, and he became inaugural NBA champion on July 2, 1921 and inaugural NYSAC champion on July 24, 1922. Of course, this was long before the foundation of the World Boxing Council (WBC) in 1963, the International Boxing Federation (IBF) in 1983 and the World Boxing Organisation (1988) but, having held the NBA and NYSAC titles simultaneously between July 24, 1922 and September 23, 1926, Jack Dempsey was effectively the first undisputed heavyweight champion in history.

His reign came to an end at the hands of the hitherto unheralded Gene Tunney, who won the NBA title, by unanimous decision, at Sesquicentennial Stadium, Philadelphia. Tunney also won the rematch – later christened ‘The Long Count Fight’ – at Soldiers Field, Chicago, a year later in similar fashion.

Has Tiger Woods won more ‘major’ golf championships than anyone else?

Has Tiger Woods won more ‘major’ golf championships than anyone else? The simple answer is no, he has not. Nevertheless, having completed his comeback from a debilitating back injury – which saw him plummet to #1,199 in the world golf rankings and put his career at risk – by winning the Masters Tournament in April, 2019, Tiger Woods remains head and shoulders above the current crop of golfers in terms of major titles won.

Notwithstanding the admirable Tom Watson, who turns 70 in 2019, yet continues to play competitive golf – albeit limited to a handful of appearances on the senior tour – Tiger Woods has ten more ‘major’ victories to his name than any other current player. His nearest rival in that respect is Phil Mickelson, who won his fifth major at the Open in 2013, but is five years Woods’ senior and, with all due respect, is running out of time to make up ground on his illustrious rival.

Indeed, Woods’ career total of 15 majors is second in the all-time list behind only Jack Nicklaus who, between 1962 and 1986 – when he won the Masters Tournament, for a record sixth time, at the age of 46 – amassed 18 Grand Slam wins. When he won his first major championship, the Masters Tournament in 1997, at the age of 21, Woods beat Nicklaus, by then a 57-year-old veteran, by 29 strokes, but over two decades later still has work to do to pass the ‘Golden Bear’ for most major golf championships won.

Which team holds the record for the lowest number of points in a Premier League season?

Which team holds the record for the lowest number of points in a Premier League season? In March, 2019, Huddersfield Town were relegated from the Premier League after 32 matches of a 38-match season, making them just the third team, after Derby County and Ipswich Town, to be heading into the second-tier with half a dozen games remaining. However, even if the Terriers lose both of their remaining fixtures in the 2018/19 season, their total of 14 points will not be the lowest in Premier League history.

The unenviable record for the lowest number of points in a Premier League season is held by Derby County who, in 2007/08, amassed just 11. Newly, and unexpectedly, promoted, Derby County won just one game all season and, by the time they parted company with manager Billy Davies, by ‘mutual consent’, in November, 2007, had accumulated just 6 points from 14 matches and were bottom of the league. Davies’ replacement, Paul Jewell, failed to inspire a revival and, by the end of the season, Derby County had set a whole series of unwelcome Premier League records, including for fewest goals scored (20) and most goals conceded (89) – resulting in an eye-watering goal difference of -69 – and for most losses (29).

Why are tennis balls changed so frequently?

Why are tennis balls changed so frequently?

Modern tennis balls consist of an inner rubber core, filled with pressurised air, and a outer cover, made of wool or nylon, which is bound to the core by means of a heated press. According to the International Tennis Federation (ITF), when a tennis ball is dropped, vertically, onto a smooth, granite block from a height of 100”, or 8’4”, it should rebound to a height between 53” and 58”.

However, after a period of serious play – typically about three hours – the cover of a tennis ball may become fluffed up, so that the ball does not fly through the air as fast as a new one, and the ball may lose internal pressure, so that it does not bounce as high. Obviously, both these factors can adversely affect the control and accuracy of a tennis player, so tennis balls are routinely changed after every seven and nine games, alternately, throughout the course of a tennis match. The first ball change takes place after just seven games to allow for the warm-up. High humidity increases the moisture content of a tennis ball, and hence its mass, and high temperature can cause the ball to bounce higher, so ‘new’ balls are stored in a courtside refrigerator, maintained at a constant 68°F, or 20°C, to keep them in optimal condition.

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